Home

Friends of the Missouri Breaks Monument is the 501(c)(3) friends group of the Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument – where the Wild and Scenic Missouri River flows through nearly half-a-million acres of central Montana prairies and badlands.

The Monument is one of the crown jewels of the National Conservation Lands. The Monument is managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and is public land that belongs to all Americans.

The Friends were established in 2001. We’re the only locally based advocacy group working to protect the Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument. The Friends aim to protect and preserve the Monument by:

  • Educating the public
  • Advocating for responsible access and environmentally responsible uses
  • Supporting groups and agencies that protect and restore the Monument

Recent Posts

Salt Cedar Volunteer Days – July 22, 23 and August 11

For a person with even an ounce of wanderlust, the twists and turns of the coulees in the Missouri Breaks Monument can prove an irresistible temptation. Here, the opportunities to explore little-traversed bits of public land are nearly endless, and a closer look can reveal quite a bit about the character of this rugged landscape.

The Montana Conservation Corps (MCC) crew that spent all last week at Hole-in-the-Wall searching for salt cedar certainly experienced the Monument up-close. In addition to the few weeds they discovered, the crew spotted several lounging rattlesnakes, uncovered one mule deer shed, and marveled at sweeping walls of white sandstone.

The Friends hired MCC for six weeks of pulling salt cedar, or tamarisk, from the river corridor and surrounding riparian habitat this summer. Salt cedar is an invasive, woody shrub that is gaining ground in the American West and threatening the health of native species, such as the plains cottonwood.

Foxtail sways in the breeze as the crew explores a coulee. Photo Friends.

Foxtail sways in the breeze as the crew explores a coulee in search of salt cedar. (Photo Friends).

Upon discovering salt cedar, the crew dug them up and removed the crowns so they wouldn’t be able to sprout again. Luckily, the salt cedar infestation at Hole-in-the-Wall proved quite small, and the crew was able to scour much of the shoreline and coulee bottoms to ensure there was no trace of the weed.

Rachel, an MCC crew member, surveys a small salt cedar shrub before attacking it with a combination shovel/pick hand tool.

Rachael, an MCC crew member, surveys a small salt cedar shrub before attacking it with a combination shovel/pick hand tool. (Photo Friends).

 

Austin Taperman marks the location of a salt cedar specimen in a GPS. This helps the BLM track salt cedar infestations from year-to-year.

Austin Taperman marks the location of a salt cedar specimen in a GPS. This helps the BLM track salt cedar infestations from year-to-year. (Photo Friends).

There are four weeks of weed pulling work left this summer, and you’re invited to join us for one or more days in order to help MCC crews combat salt cedar. The work will take place on July 22 and July 23 at Judith Landing and August 11 at James Kipp Recreation Area.

DSC_0764

Sign up today to volunteer with these hardworking young folks to make a difference on your public lands. (Photo Friends).

Please contact Sara Meloy at sara@missouribreaks.org to sign up. We hope to see you out there on your public lands!

  1. Friends to pull salt cedar from Monument Leave a reply
  2. Friends join historic preservation group on the Missouri River Leave a reply
  3. Update from the Breaks Leave a reply
  4. Celebrating our newest nat’l monument! Leave a reply
  5. Spring greenup and river cleanup Leave a reply
  6. Our spring newsletter is out! 1 Reply
  7. Lessons from a River Leave a reply
  8. Cottonwood Planting 101: A guide to success 1 Reply
  9. Welcoming Stornetta to the National Conservation Lands 1 Reply